Approved by #5: The Futurama Logo

Approved by #5: The Futurama Logo

In all of the recent commotion, I forgot to show you how I made the top of the Futurama Quilt back. It’s a good thing you all keep me honest and remind me when I miss a beat! Without further ado….   To get started, I went on a hunt for various images of the Futurama Logo. I found this one that included the star field background (maybe it even subliminally encouraged me to pick a star field background for the quilt). When I enlarged the image, I noticed that there were three distinct colors. The red for the letters, mustard (dijon) in the shadows and mustard (yellow) outlining the red sections. I decided that I would use mustard:dijon fabric in the shadows, red on the letters, and mustard:yellow thread to outline the them.     I handled the letters a little differently than I’ve described the face panels. The banner is large (74″ across) and I knew I’d have to pick it up and move it around bunches and felt like spray baste just wasn’t going to do the job. I used a product called Misty Fuse. It is a lightweight fusible webbing that can be used very similarly to the paper backed fusibles. I started by fusing Misty Fuse to one side of all of the red and mustard:dijon fabrics. (remember, the mustard:yellow is thread) I made my freezer paper templates as described in previous posts and attempted to cut out my pieces. In the past, I’ve been very successful with Misty Fuse. Misty Fuse is one of my favorite products ever, but in this case, it...
Approved by #5, The Futurama Quilt: Big Back Reveal!

Approved by #5, The Futurama Quilt: Big Back Reveal!

So. I spent the weekend at Nevermore watching some excellent zombie films and somehow I managed to catch the plague! I’ve been sick sick sick since Sunday and have finally joined the living again today. I decided I needed a little pick me up and I just can’t stand not showing you this quilt back another minute. Serendipity! Without further ado….. TA-DA! The fabric I used for the sashing is “Space Galaxy” from Timeless Treasures. I spotted it on a website where it was sold out and went on a mission! I swear, it was sold out everywhere except for a yard here and there on Etsy. I finally found 4.5 yards at equilter.com and was so grateful when it actually shipped! It looks it is readily available now, if you want it get some while it lasts! Remember when I mentioned the blue fabric washed with Hypnotaod? This is it! To show you the scale of this quilt, I took a few pictures with a real life human, me! And here’s that crazy Luigi, always finding his way into my pictures! LoL! He’s so crazy! I’ve told you tons about the process of making this quilt! You can do it! Check out the index of all posts to get started. Even with all that info, there’s still a to say about this quilt. I can show you how I made the logo, created the curve, and the cutting diagram for the galaxy fabric. Tell me, do you want to know or have you had enough Futurama for a bit? I really do love this quilt! I hope to...
Approved by Number 5, Futurama Quilt: The Morbo label

Approved by Number 5, Futurama Quilt: The Morbo label

One thing I suck at is putting labels on my quilts. By the time I get to the label, I’m so tired of that quilt I just want to BE DONE. The allure of “I can add a label anytime” grows stronger and stronger. Before I know it, a year has passed, then two. In an effort to correct that, I’m trying to add the label step as part of piecing the back. I figure if I do it when I’m still excited about the project and have enough work to do with the quilting and the binding that I’m not near the finish line, I’ll actually think about it and put some effort into it. Since I’m out of room for applique panels, I thought the label would be the perfect place to give the  Morbo DVD cover a try. I probably could have made him out of tiny little pieces of fabric (I still think it might be fun to try that), but I love to make thread painted patches. Because I thought it would be more fun-ner, I went with thread. You can see all the details on the process of making one of these in my Beginner Thread Painting Tutorial from a few months back. The process is exactly the same with a few more colors and hoop move to get all of his parts in. Here he is along the way: I used the background color of the DVD cover for the label color, kona silver. I thought about a lot of ways to write out the words on the label, even tried a...
Approved by #5, Futurama Quilt: All Glory to the Hypnotoad!

Approved by #5, Futurama Quilt: All Glory to the Hypnotoad!

I LOVE this artwork. The alternate color scheme is perfect. Seriously, is there anything better than a pink hypnotoad? I think they should go back through all of the appearances of hypnotoad episodes and make him pink! Of all of the panels, this, the final one I completed was by far the easiest. It could be argued that I was more experienced at this point, but I think it is a combination of experience and the fact that it is a fairly simple set of shapes. There was not a ton of cutting or any difficult areas to get into with that zig zag stitch. Hypnotoad did present a unique set of challenges though. First there were the rings around his eyes. I probably could have done those in three layers of fabric, but felt like that would be a little flat. We can’t have a flat toad! Secondly, there are tons of rings in the background. Very very very thin rings. I could have replicated them with strips of fabric, a zig zag and lots of patience, but I felt like it would look messier than I wanted it to. I finally settled on trying the zig zag without the strips of fabric also known as satin stitching. For the satin stitches, I used the stabilizer mentioned in Zoidberg’s post. I did several tests ahead of working on the actual panel to make sure my tension was where it needed to be. My sewing machine has a most excellent auto tension for most things, but I find I need to set both the foot pressure and the thread...
Approved by #5, Futurama Quilt: Amy Wong’s Panel

Approved by #5, Futurama Quilt: Amy Wong’s Panel

We’ve made it to Amy!  This panel uses a few cool tricks to create the helmet. Since I’m building her in layers. I created the background color for the helmet first. The very last piece that went on is the white strip that creates the highlight and finishes out the effect. I think it may have been even more effective if the colors “behind” the helmet were different, but it wouldn’t work in the limited color palette. Keeping her inline with the others makes the most sense even if it does make her my least favorite of the bunch. We’ve been through all of the steps for templates, preparing, creating templates, cutting, and sewing. Now I’ll show you a few of the more difficult areas to zig zag around. Note: I used contrasting fabrics, contrasting threads, and extra wide zig zags for the demo photos so you can really see what I’m describing. When you choose the correct size zig zags and threads, it looks much cleaner than what you see here. Points All of these panels have some number of points. They are tiny points, wide points, nearly 90 degree angle points. I handled all of mine the same way: Zig zag right to the end of the piece. The goal is to get the stitch completely over the point. Note the position of the needle – in this case, the right side. Lift the presser foot in needle down position and turn the fabric for the new direction down the opposite side. You see the problem? The needle is in the right position. If I started sewing now,...
Approved by #5, the Futurama Quilt: Zoidberg gets some stitches

Approved by #5, the Futurama Quilt: Zoidberg gets some stitches

Next in the series…. Zoidberg! I dig Zoidberg’s art too! I like the clever use of color and leading lines to suggest things. My brain had filled in places like around the claw that I didn’t notice were incomplete until I started making the applique pieces. This panel uses a lot of black for shadowing which is perfect. It adds pop to the spiral, mirror, and tentacles. If you’ve been following along, you may remember last week’s cliffhanger where I told you about magic items #1 and #2, but not magic item #3. Wait no more! Here it is, Pellon Embroidery Stitch and Tear Lite:I love this stabilizer. It is lightweight, inexpensive, and does a beautiful job of keeping things nice and flat even when I’m using near satin length zig zag stitches. For each of the panels, I laid out two pieces of it crosswise and then laid the panel on top of them. You certainly could pin the panel to the stabilizer, but I opted not to. I wanted these panels as flat as flat can be and even a pin as small as an applique pin adds bulk and slightly changes the panels shape. I found that I had no trouble getting started  with the pin-less stabilizer. Once I started stitching down the appliques, the stabilizer did just fine and didn’t move around or get bent. <Side Quest! > It is a tear-a-way stabilizer which means there will be bits of it left under the zig zags after it is torn away. Not a crisis, it isn’t anymore than what you would have left behind with...