Doggie Doughnuts gets a name and a border!

Emily is moving right along with her quilt! She put the blocks together in rows, then connected the rows. Seems fairly painless, but took at little patience from mom and nine year old. Here she is showing off the finished rows.

DoggieDoughnuts (2)

Next was time to connect the borders. I’ll be completely honest with you all, I internally questioned her judgment in choosing a bright orange that appears nowhere in the quilt. As a matter of fact, there was only one print in the center fabrics that had any orange in it at all and it was nowhere close to this Halloween shade. Turns out – it is a pretty good call! I love it and think it looks perfect especially with the smaller black border. It’s certainly a choice I would have never made and can clearly see the error of my ways.

DoggieDoughnuts (3)

Well, now we have to quilt it. I *think* I’m going to sit her down with a walking foot and let her make as straight of a line as she can. Her seams aren’t exactly perfect, so I think diagonal lines would be best. What do you all think, should we try to mark the lines first or just sew and love what comes out? If mark, suggestions on good methods?

What about the quilting on the borders? I’d like to allow her to try out the free motion foot, but I really think that is way too much (I see bloody fingers in the future). Stitch in the ditch maybe?

DoggieDoughnuts (1)
I love this silly kid!

She named it Doggie Doughnuts. I presume because it has both doggies and doughnuts in the prints. I’m glad she settled there some of the other ones were quite out there!

Want to see all the posts related to Emily’s Doggie Doughnuts? Here’s a handy index!

Linking in with 627handworks for Thursday Threads.

27 Comments

  1. Well done you and Emily! It’s fantastic and the orange border is perfect 🙂

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  2. Good going, for the both of you! My daughter is six and a creative messy soul. Our creative collaborations have been less than rewarding. Maybe when she’s nine? Again, great job!

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    • I hear you! We had our moments with this one. I’ve been labeled an “orderer, director, and corrector”. I try so hard to just step back and not get bent out shape over the details. I think the quilting is going to be hard and will likely try both of our patience. We’re going for it anyway! 🙂

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  3. That is a wonderful, colorful, cheerful quilt. It will be a terrific memory of making it with you.

    I helped my 7-year-old granddaughter make a quilt. She still loves it four years later. The same summer I did the same with my 9-year-old grandson. Believe it or not, my granddaughter did a better job!

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    • Oh that’s great! I bet they were lots of fun to put together and great memories. I hope we get through the quilting part. It is really hard for me to stand back an not constantly correct her. 🙂

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  4. Fantastic!! I’m all for intuitive colour selection – you only have to look at nature to see ‘wild’ combinations, for me everything goes together, it’s just a matter of getting the right hues!!! Emily’s a natural 🙂 So pleased for her!

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    • You’re quite right Stephie! Its funny how things sometimes come together when you least expect it.

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  5. I think she is a cutie! The walking foot should be an adventure and I mean that in a good way:) The orange is perfect. She has an eye for color!

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    • Thanks Sara! I’m a bit worried how she’s going to handle the weight of the quilt, but I’m sure we’ll figure it out. 🙂

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  6. That orange is perfect! I wouldn’t have picked it either…orange really isn’t my thing, but it looks great on this quilt.

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    • Funny how that worked out right? I love how she just chooses things by instinct rather than lots of color theory. It has certainly made me want to lean on instinct a little more myself.

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  7. Wid……BEAUTIFUL!!!!! You made a great color choice on border. Love some orange and love some Wid and Suedre.

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  8. What a beautiful quilt made by a beautiful young lady. I am very impressed and very proud of her for her accomplishment. That is something she will be able to talk about for many years to come. I love you very much Miss Emily.

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    • Thanks Nina! I’ll be sure to pass along the message!

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  9. What a talented young lady! A beautiful quilt that she will be able to treasure. How wise to let her make her own choices for the fabrics.

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    • Thanks Rose! It has been really fun to watch and do!

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  10. What a WONDERFUL quilt, Emily. It looks so happy, just like you. You’ll enjoy quilting it, too.

    Susan, Does Emily know cursive writing? If she does, that might be a good FMQ “pattern” since she will have a handle on how to do it and what size to use. She can write all about making the quilt.

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    • Sadly, cursive is no longer part of the curriculum in NC. She’s had some exposure to it with her name, because she likes fancy writing, but that is about it. I’d like to teach her sometime though – maybe quilting letters could get her started! Thanks for the suggestion!

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    • It’s the same here in California. They don’t teach cursive. If you’re lucky, they give you a booklet with practice pages to trace the letters. You work on it during the time that the teacher reads a pleasure book to the class.

      I really wonder about the wisdom in that!

      Doodling is a good way to get ready for FMQ. She can use a notebook and find a doodle pattern she likes and practice on paper. It will get it into her muscle memory. Might work. Just a thought.

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  11. Awesome! And she was right with the border, it is definitely one i wouldn’t have picked but somehow it works! I say let her rip with the walking foot, no marking, no measuring, just have at it! right into the borders! Then maybe make a mini quilt/mugrug to let her try FMQ!

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    • That’s really advice. She has a small applique project she wants to try when she’s done with the quilt. That’s probably a good one for FMQ. I have to tell you – letting it rip with the walking foot kind of sounds like fun! Maybe I should try that. 🙂

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  12. Wonderful, and I love the orange boarder! Great choice. Looks like she is following in mom’s footsteps…very talented and creative!

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    • She’s great right?! Thanks so much for stopping by and encouraging her!

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  13. Great job Emily! You are the most awesome 9 year old ever!

    I say just go with the flow on the diagonal lines, why mark it. She did such a great job picking the fabric that spoke to her, let the sewing machine speak to her, too! I’d attempt FMQ on a 5×5 square first and see how she does! Just let her do her thing, this is going to be the best quilt you’ve ever seen regardless of how she quilts it. You have an incredibly talented and creative little girl, I hope to one day have kids as cool as she is!

    Good luck with the rest of your quilting, Emily. I know it’s going to be dog-tastic! 😀

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    • You’re probably exactly right! Just go for it, that has been theme for this right from the beginning! She got an applique penguin pattern at the quilt store. I told her she absolutely can’t touch it until the quilt is done, no UFOs! Now, if I could only tell myself that….

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    • LOL I think all quilters should apply that rule! Right now I only have 2 UFOs! Better than 100! lol! She is going to do such a wonderful job on this, I cannot wait to see the finished quilt!

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